Phoenix Indian School

The Second Half-Century

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The Phoenix Indian School was a boarding school founded in 1891 with the goal of fostering the assimilation of Native Americans into white society. The school served as a federal educational institution for Native American children from tribes in Arizona and elsewhere in the Southwest.

This book provides a history of the school from 1930 until the graduation of its final class of nineteen students in 1990. Dorothy Parker tells how the Phoenix Indian School not only adapted to policy changes instituted by the federal government but also had to contend with events occurring in the world around it, such as the Great Depression, World War II, and the advent of the "red power" movement.

Although the Phoenix Indian School has closed its doors forever, the National Park Service has undertaken an archaeological analysis of the site and an architectural documentation of the school's buildings. This history of its final years further attests to the legacy of this institution.

The University of Arizona Press’s Century Collection employs the latest in digital technology to make previously out-of-print books from our notable backlist available once again. Enriching historical and cultural experiences for readers, this collection offers these volumes unaltered from their original publication and in affordable digital or paperback formats.

Phoenix Indian School
112 Pages 7 x 10 Published: 2017 Paperback (9780816535798)

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